Now Available: My New Book, “Nurturing Curiosity and Success in Science, Math, and Learning”

Today has been a special day! After many months of the gestation process, copies of my new book finally arrived. “Gestation” is an appropriate term for use by any author when referring to the birth of a new book and its long-awaited delivery – not by the stork, but by UPS!

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From initial concept to a tangible book-in-the-hand is a long, hard journey – ask any author – but the satisfaction of finally holding and perusing the end result is worth it all.

After publishing my first book on motion physics for the layperson four years ago, I was in no way ready to consider beginning yet another book. However, for both authors and imaginative inventors, a good idea is hard to resist, and the theme of America’s students struggling in science and math relative to students in other countries proved too important and interesting to pass up. More important than national test scores and rankings are the frustrations felt by many parents, guardians, and teachers when their students are underperforming in school.

 Why Do So Many Students Struggle with
Learning – Especially in Science and Math?

NCS Bookmark Front Layout_FinalStudent standardized test scores in science and math are mediocre at best and falling for America’s students relative to many other countries – a rather shocking development. Once I began to seriously reflect upon why so many students are underperforming in school, the reasons quickly became clear to me.

Diagnosing the problem was the easier half of the drill; finding cures for the ailing performance of so many of our students proved more challenging, yet I am confident in my ultimate RX prescription for healing our students’ academic woes. The integrated guide and plan I offer as a remedy for parents, guardians, mentors…and teachers, too, is based on common-sense parenting/mentoring and learning principles – many of which have been lost to recent generations. Today’s ubiquitous technology, while often very helpful and even necessary, is also identified as a significant cause of our problems – but by no means the only one.

As I wrote the book and solicited comments, one that surfaced more than once went like this: “The parents and guardians who, together with their students, most need the guide and plan you offer in the book, are the least likely to buy it.” I sadly agree, to an extent, but remain confident that many struggling parents and guardians will take advantage of my ideas and suggestions.

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I envision a very viable market for the book with prospective parents and the parents of preschoolers who wish to be proactive in maximizing school success by providing an early, nurturing environment for their youngsters. Not everyone is initially equipped by nature with the insight required for effective parenting/mentoring. Good parenting is like so many other ventures in life: The best way to proceed is by working hard and by working smart. Highlighting that latter part will prove to be how my book offers the greatest value to parent/mentors.

For a closer look at the book and how to order it, click on “My New Book on Science / Math Education” on the blog header or click on the following link:

https://reasonandreflection.wordpress.com/about-my-new-book/

To go directly to the book’s dedicated website for still more information and to order, click on the following link:

http://reasonandreflection.com/book2/

For an excerpt from the book, also see my previous post: “Teaching Children Math…By Example,” in the archives for Sept. 27, 2014. Click the following link:

https://reasonandreflection.wordpress.com/2014/09/27/teaching-children-math-by-example/

 

Do We Need Yet Another Book on Education? I Believe We Do!

Today, I uploaded the manuscript files for my new book to the publisher. The gestation process of some two years has been long and hard – as anyone who has published a book can attest, but the pleasure of “putting thoughts to paper” keeps one going during the process. The book’s title reads: Nurturing Curiosity and Success in Science, Math, and Learning.

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Is there room for another book?

Is it, as the title suggests, a book on the education of our children with an emphasis on science and math? Yes, but its central theme has more to do with the tremendous influence of parent/mentors on the education and the “learning attitudes” of their young students and less to do with the mechanics of education which are so often discussed and debated in the media.

I believe that the well-documented, poor and declining performance of America’s students in science and mathematics is not the result of “educational deficiencies” in our schools. “Better” schools, “better” teaching, longer classroom hours, and more money are not the real solutions. We are looking for answers in all the wrong places!

The number-one problem in our schools:  Students who are sent to school unprepared and unwilling to take advantage of their opportunity – students who are not ready and willing to learn. And what is the key to preparing students for wholehearted engagement in that process called learning? Nurturing curiosity about the real world around them and instilling a mature student attitude which grounds them in the realities of life – these are the keys.

A mature student attitude? Sophisticates at age six? Not really. A “mature” student attitude, in this context, embodies an early appreciation that, as young students, they are privileged to be able to attend school and learn things that will not only fashion a career path, someday, but will ultimately impart the “joy” of living that knowledge and an informed mind can bestow.

Students should understand at an early age that the “duty” aspect of going to school has far less to do with “having to learn this stuff” and much more to do with their personal responsibility to themselves not to waste the wonderful opportunity which is afforded them.

As the book points out, parent/mentors have a clear responsibility to regularly transport their young beyond the limited horizon of day-to-day growing-up in this distracted world of social-connectedness. My book illustrates how to reveal, to youngsters, the fascinating world which exists beyond our sometimes mind-numbing, daily existence. It is all about the awareness of young minds to the possibilities which exist for them and their need to embrace life and study habits which will turn those possibilities into realities.

Curiosity is such a key characteristic, such an important factor – curiosity about the mysteries of being human, about the world around us, about the universe and beyond. Albert Einstein implied the importance of curiosity in not only science, but life and living as well, with his insistence that, “I have no special talents. I am only passionately curious.” Curiosity is the incubator of the self-motivation that makes learning satisfying and rewarding – as opposed to a chore.

And I believe that my youngest granddaughter was truly curious one Sunday morning as her family was preparing to leave for church. True to her ebullient, one-of-a-kind personality, she, out of the blue, blurted out, “How does a fart go through your clothes?” Her parents had no time before church to offer a simple scientific explanation – would that they could! When my daughter told me about this little episode, I enjoyed a good laugh, but subsequently realized that my granddaughter’s question was a legitimate scientific inquiry – something to be encouraged!

And just how do parent/mentors…and teachers, go about nurturing curiosity and success in science, math, and learning? Providing a common-sense guide and plan for parent/mentors, and teachers was my mission in writing this book. Drawing upon the experience of raising two daughters along with the picture-window view on the world of classroom teaching afforded by the three schoolteachers in my life, I offer my best perspective to parent/mentors …and teachers on how to proceed. Ultimately, a “learning attitude” begins at home. Teachers have a full plate with the task of effectively presenting the material to students; they certainly do not have the time or the opportunity to motivate an entire classroom of students to take full advantage of what the schools offer.

I hope and sincerely believe that frustrated parent/mentors (teachers, too) whose children are under-performing in school will benefit from at least one more book on education and nurturing student success.

It should be available by the end of September.